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AMER FOOD WALK

AMER FOOD WALK

Amber or rather Amer is an ancient city that was constructed in 12th century AD. Eventually, after 500 years, to accommodate the ever-increasing population, a new city by the name Jaipur was formed in 1727. The city also holds the pride to also be the first planned city of India. As Jaipur prospered, the city of Amer began to lose its charm and is known for having the majestic 12th-century fort that is open for tourists today. However, just like the beauty is in the eyes of the observer, it looked in the right way beyond the fort, you can feel the energies of centuries-old history that the city has to offer.

Food walks, in general, is a very incredible way to explore an area and see a city through the lens of food. When it becomes an exploration food walks, it becomes a cherry on the top. There is excitement around what special dish we might end up eating, then the fun of going inside the lanes and sub lanes of never seen before areas and getting mesmerised by the beauty this city has to offer. 

With these thoughts along with being of a mission to know about street food all over the city, we decided to go on a food walk to explore the ancient city with food as the medium.

The food walk took place on Sunday, 8th of December with eight of enthusiastic lovers of food community from Jaipur who assembled near the haathis(elephants) standing outside the Amer fort. In total, we explored the city for three hours and covered five food stops along with an additional stop at the oldest temple of Jaipur. Here is our list of food we tried along with our comments on it.

  1. Jain kachori Centre stall (located opposite to SBI bank, Amer): We would have never really given it a chance had it not been because of a piece of advice given by the shopkeeper. The stall is run by an old age couple. Small-sized Kachori and Samosa are the two items in their menu. Both the items are always made fresh considering the fact that it gets over as soon as it comes out of the frying pan due to heavy demand from the people who eat there on a daily basis. The X-factor of them is the spice of hing(asafoetida) that they add in high quantity. This stall was also personally my favourite food place as well.

    JAIN KACHORI CENTER
  2. Bam Bam Shop(Sagar Road, Amer): Located in the inner lane, the shop was located under a hut a little cozy environment. We tried Kadi Rice there which taste rather pretty simple like we are used to eating at home.

    KADHI CHAWAL
  3. Paratha with aloo sabji, garlic chutney, curd chutney and chaach(Car parking, Amer fort): For me, this was the most unusual spot for which we actually trekked for 30 mins to reach.  A lady sitting on one side near to the exit of parking sells one of the most amazing thali. Apparently, all the drivers that come to Amer fort tend to eat their lunch at this place only.

    PARATHA WITH ALOO SABZI
  4. Jagdamba paratha house(Opposite to Haathi stand, Amber): Apparently the only shop I had heard about in the past(although never tried it before), is a place where you can have to eat too many types of stuff Parathas cooked over pan kept over wood fire. We tried their Paneer Paratha, Mooli(radish) Paratha, Gobi(cauliflower) Paratha and Aloo pyaaz(onion potato) Paratha.

    JAGDAMBA PARATHA HOUSE
  5. Madhures restaurant: The dessert place, we tried special milk solid of Amber’s special Peda. This is the sweet that is also used as prasad in temples in the city.  The shop is 100 years old and really popular for getting namkeen and sweets as well, definitely my new personal favourite place.

    PEDAS

We are planning to run it as a series of food exploration walks that we will keep on doing on every alternate Sunday under HungryHitchhiker with the mentorship of Delhi Food Walks. To know more about these tours or become a part of it, you can email us at [email protected] or check our website www.hungryhitchhiker.com

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VRINDAVAN FOOD TOUR

 

Located just 15 kilometres (9.3 miles) from Mathura, Vrindavan is a sacred town full of innumerable temples with intricate architecture and carvings. As per the Hindu mythology, this was where Lord Krishna spent his childhood years and also showcased his divine love for Radha. Numerous devotees from all across the country and beyond come here to seek divine blessings. Despite the hustle and bustle all around, you can’t escape the peace and sanctity of this heritage place.

Apart from the religious association, Vrindavan also boasts of a quintessential food culture, dominated by milk based delicacies, that has been moulded by the spiritual connection. The traditional fare on the streets and at household are mostly Sattvik food. The street food scene prevalent here is still shielded away from the impact of the growing fast food culture.  In this blog we bring you a soulful street food escapades from Vrindavan that was mostly centered around the bustling lanes of Sri Banke Bihari Mandir.

Urad Dal Kachoris from Agarwal Mithai Wala

 

Just like the locals, we started our food trail with a traditional breakfast at Agarwal Mithai Bhandar. After having the Gujrati dhokla from the counter outside the shop we quickly moved inside to relish delightful spread of Urad Dal Kachoris, potato and pumpkin sabzis and fresh curd. This humble spread was all prepared in pure desi ghee and had no onion and garlic in it. There is something very enriching about such food that makes us feel more wholesome, calm and joyous. One interesting thing about this eatery is that, if you like the food then you can ring the bell placed outside the shop to announce it.

Khurchan Malai from Radhe Radhe Pede Wala

 

After the cheerful start our second stop was Radhe Radhe Pede Wala, a very old establishment in the city whose sweets are a craze with all sweet lovers. We couldn’t help prevent us from drooling over the eclectic spread of sweets over here. According to the owner who was a genial fellow, the shop still stocks some very traditional sweets that are very popular with the locals and visitors. One of them is the Peda. Though it appears to be a humble sweet but the process of making it is quite tedious. Milk is simmered for a long time till the moisture evaporates and the residue attains a dough like consistency. It is then mixed with sugar and cardamom powder and tiny balls are rolled out of it. These fellows have mastered the art. We also loved their Khurchan Malai which is a well cooked sweetened Malai or cream. Scooping it out of the tiny and adorable earthen pots was so much fun. We highly recommend this toothsome dessert. Their Moong Dal Burfi was soft, pleasant, greasy and delicious.

While visiting the city be very careful about the impish monkeys whose menace is simply unpredictable. They are notorious for snatching away your belongings. So be very careful about your wallets, spectacles, mobile phones etc. The astonishing thing is they mostly return your things in lieu of any food especially mango drink. But it does cause damage to your belongings and you as well. 

Kanji Vada from Manish Cheela Shop

 

After those irresistible sweets we arrived at Manish Cheela Shop for their Kanji Vadas and Cheela. We were tempted to try them both as they appeared super appetising. The former was a light and refreshing snacks comprising of small deep fried moong dal dumplings soaked in mustard powdered flavoured fermented water. A delicacy essentially from Rajasthan and Gujarat, the Kanji vada is preferred for its excellent digestive and detoxifying qualities. The latter one was a zesty Cheela or stuffed moong dal crepes. Cheela is a popular snack from UP and this one from Manish’s shop was filling and flavourful.

 

Satvik Thali from Jaipuria Bhojanalay.

 

For lunch we went to Jaipuria Bhojanalay to try their unlimited Satvik thali that is very popular with the visitors. It was an eclectic spread of roti, rice, dal, bottle gourd curry, kadhi, chutney. Everything was prepared on the woodfire oven sans onion and garlic. It was light, wholesome and tasty. Even though it is an unlimited thali but there is one catch, that is you can’t share it with anyone else. Check out this place for a proper lunch or dinner option.

 

Aloo tikki from Mukesh Chaat Wala

 

Like all other parts of UP, Vrindavan too is also famous for some amazing chats. And so we couldn’t resist ourselves from trying a serving of Aloo tikki chat. It was truly satisfying. The melange of flavours and textures made it endearing.

Next was the turn of paan from Ashoke Paan, a local favourite. Being a Paan aficionado we can easily vouch for the brilliance of the simple betel quid that Ashoke ji modestly handed to us.

Rabri Chuski

 

With our palette cleansed and our appetite restored we stopped by a random cart selling something very interesting. It was the Rabri Chuski, an innovative take on Rabri. This would remind you of gola or crushed ice pops. Essentially it was a yummy rabri served on a bed of crushed ice. 

While ambling down the street full of enthusiastic visitors, we spotted a young boy selling Golgappas with differently flavoured water. The flavoured water with different condiments like hing, harad etc was lip smacking. Do make an effort to trace him down and binge on his zesty golgappas. 

Kesar Gulab Lassi

 

Our final stop in this gratifying food exploration in the holy backdrop of Banke Bihari Mandir and its adjoining areas was Brij bihari lassi shop. The kesar gulab lassi was served in an earthen glass as delicious and refreshing as it could be.