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Lallan Kulche Wala

Lallan Kulche Wala

By Kshitij Rathore

IMG_20160729_122839Darya Ganj has been a representative of lip smacking street cuisine since time immemorial. However, in the recent time, it has lost its lustre due to the popularity of places like Hauz Khas Village and Greater Kailash market. This is the reason I decided to explore Darya Ganj ­ to rediscover its lost sheen and to explore the scrumptious food that this place offers.

I was walking around Hindu Park when I found a small cart named ‘Lallan special Chole Kulche’. Intrigued, I went up to the guy and ordered a plate of Chhole Kulche. He had 6 different kinds of Kulche to offer which, honestly, was astonishing because you rarely find more than one type of kulcha, let alone 6. So, I sat on the wooden bench he’d set aside for customers as he prepared a plate of Sooji ke kulche and chhole sprinkled with lemon on top. A glassful of raita to mellow down the spiciness of the chhole worked in my favour.

IMG_20160729_123106Originally from Bareily, UP, Lallan bhai has been working in this area for the past 25 years. The fact that this has been his family business for the past three generations really reflects in his preparation of the food. Despite having a plethora of customers swarming around his shop, he wasn’t annoyed with my enquiries. In fact, he was very cooperative.

I also tried the Jeera Kulcha which I found very staiating. The variety of kulche included Aloo Kulcha, Paneer Kulcha, Carom seed (ajwaain) Kulcha and coriander(dhaniya) Kulcha. If you’re famished after all the book shopping, you can make a pit stop here to gorge on a flavoursome plate of Chhole Kulche. I highly recommend the Jeera Kulcha as its effervescent aroma will make your mouth water. It won’t cost you a whole lot as the prices ranges from Rs. 40 to Rs. 90 per plate.

You’ll find his cart in the lane adjacent to the Darya Ganj police station facing Hindu Park.

Cost for two: Rs. 180 (approx)

Anubhav Sapra is an avid foodie! He is a Founder but proudly calls himself a Foodie-in-chief at Delhi Food Walks. He is also a street-food and Indian regional cuisine connoisseur and loves to write about street-food.
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Bhaiya Lal’s Pineapple Burfi

Bhaiya Lal’s Pineapple Burfi

By Anubhav Sapra

 Being a self confessed sweets addict, I am constantly looking out for sweet shops. Some of my favorite sweet shops in Chandni Chowk are – Chaina Ram in Fatehpuri Chowk for Karanchi halwa and sev badam, Hajari Lal Jain in Kinari Bazar for rabri and khurchan, Ghantewala near Fountain Chowk for sohan halwa, Tewari brothers near Town Hall for motichur ke laddu, Annapurna Sweets opposite Seeshganj Gurudwara for Bengali sweets and of course, Dariba Kalan’s famous jalebi.

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I was walking down the Dariba street when I spotted a mithai wala selling varieties of colorful mithais beautifully decorated with chandi vrak in separate trays. These trays were laid on the stairs of one of the Jewellery shops in Dariba Kalan. The owner, Naresh Kumar evenly spread sheets of edible chandi varak over the sweets, sprinkled pistachios burada, and covered the sweets with nets to keep flies away.

Naresh Kumar sells the sweets opposite Gali Kunjas in Dariba Kalan between Ramtaur Jewellers and Swastik Jewellers shop from 5 pm onwards. He learnt the art of making sweets from his father, who is well-known as Bhaiya lal. Bhaiya lal started the sweet shop in his name in 1936 at Shop no. 3459, Hauz Qazi, Subzi Market and Naresh Kumar took over in 1962. He has been selling the same variety of sweets.

IMG_20150530_174602The menu consists of Bengali mithai Rasbhari, Parmal stuffed with khoya, cham cham, lauki burfi, Pineapple burfi, nariyal burfi. All the sweets are prepared in a more or less similar way – with khoya as the main ingredient. All of them costs Rs 400/- kg. The sweets are weighed by using a tarazu (balance scale).

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What intrigued me most was the Pineapple burfi, which I had tasted for the first time at this sweets shop. It turned out to be excellent because it was just the right amount of sweet. It was prepared adding pineapple syrup to roasted khoya.Another Bengali sweet, Rasbhari which are small rasgullas were different from the ones we usually get. Rasbhari was not soaked in sugar syrup, it was dry from the outside and the centre was filled with thickened sugar syrup so that as soon as one bites into it their mouth fills with the sweet syrup. Other sweets, cham cham, lauki burfi, and nariyal burfi were equally amazing.

 I am delighted to add Bhaiya Lal’s sweets to my list of favorite Sweets shops in Chandni Chowk!

Anubhav Sapra is an avid foodie! He is a Founder but proudly calls himself a Foodie-in-chief at Delhi Food Walks. He is also a street-food and Indian regional cuisine connoisseur and loves to write about street-food.